The Growth of Multi-Screening

Source: www.futuremedialab.com

Multi-touch point media campaigns are not a new thing.  Outdoor, print, TV and cinema have long operated hand in hand to enable brands to reach an audience through-out the day, with people interacting with different platforms at different points of the day.  This has changed over the years however, with the introduction of a variety of differing media.  Google announced, in a piece of research in 2012 that 80% of people in the UK’s interaction with media now come through a screen, be it TV, tablets or smartphones for example.

The portable nature of laptops and especially tablets and smartphones has encouraged a dramatic growth in ‘multi-screening’, where an individual interacts with multiple screened devices at the same time (Marketing Week, 2012).  Advertisers too are catching up with this trend with ad campaigns that run simultaneously on multiple screens, designed to drive response by emphasising the brand’s message to a consumers on all of the devices they may be using at one time

The British market has seen an increase in the number of advertising brands seeing benefit in multi-screen campaigns.  Some opt for ad campaigns on TV, along with online and tablet display advertising spots.  However, the most noticeable of interactive multi-screen campaigns have come with the inclusion by advertisers, of links to Twitter feeds on their TV advertising (Hawlins, 2013).  This is done in an attempt to drive social media interaction with a brand which ‘helps organise and steer the conversation’ (Twitter, 2013) on that brand.

Thinkbox reported in 2012 that 72% of TV viewers stay in the room for TV advertising when not multi-screening; while 81% do when multi-screening, meaning that not only are the multi-screening audience more likely to see advertising, the ability to reach them on multiple platforms will increase the impact.

The opportunities to take advantage of the multi-screening audience are also increasing with improvements in targeting technologies.  The technological facility to target specific households by their social demographic grouping and deliver messages to individual screens within that household now exists.  This technology considers all of the devices/screens in a household as part of the same ‘ecosystem’ and delivers ads across each platform accordingly.  19 million households across the UK are currently accessible in this manner. There is significant power to be gained from targeting both the breadwinner and decision makers in a household across multiple platforms simultaneously and for further details on how to take advantage of such technology please contact Four Marketing & Media.

Research of the US media market, undertaken by the Association of National Advertisers (ANA) and Nielsen shows that 20% of media budgets are now ear-marked for multi-screen campaigns.  (WARC,2013).  This trend will also continue to grow, with the sale of tablets predicted to continue to grow dramatically (Lomas, 2013) and the expansion of 4G networks and ever faster broadband connections ensuring smoother online access, delivering an easier route to interaction.  Advertising that takes advantage of the multi-screening phenomenon will therefore increase, given the repetition and strength of message a campaign of this ilk affords an advertiser and the ability it gives these advertisers to wrestle back the share of voice, lost by the divergence of advertisers across multiple screens.

Digital Ad Spend at an All-Time High

According to the latest IAB Digital Adspend report, advertisers have spent a record six-month high of £3.04 billion online. British consumers spend a staggering one in every 12 minutes online, equating to 43 hours a month!

Fuelled by smartphone ownership reaching 68% of the population in June 2013, mobile advertising now accounts for 14% of all digital ad spend, which grew like-for-like by 127% to £429.2 million in the first half of the year, almost double that for the same period in 2012.

Total mobile display advertising, which includes video, increased like-for-like by 195% to £105.5 million in the first half of 2013 and for the first time, consumer goods has doubled its share in a year to 26.8%.

Another online first, the consumer goods sector overtook entertainment and media, as the biggest spender as a mobile display advertiser, and finance as the biggest spender on the digital display advertising platform.

Research also shows that the tablet ad spend for the first half of 2013 was around the £10.5 million mark, up from approximately £2.4 million for the first half of 2012. This increase in ad spend could be a result of the increase in tablet users – almost one in three consumers in the UK will be using a tablet this year, according to research from eMarketer.

By 2017, the eMarketer estimates that more than half of the UK population will use a tablet device regularly.

One explanation for such a radical increase is the increasing availability of low-end tablet alternatives. Last month, Tesco announced the launch of its own brand tablet, called Hudl, which will retail at £119, a mere quarter of the cost of Apple’s iPad!

Another reason for such an increase could be that as audiences are more accustomed with going online via mobile devices, they are becoming more ‘adjusted’ to using tablets, with the majority of tablet owners still in the 25-54 age range.

UK Tablet Users

Source: www.emarketer.com

Commercial Radio’s Mid-Life Crisis?

Radio

Source: www.mediaweek.co.uk

Commercial radio recently celebrated its 40th birthday – time for a mid-life crisis?

Launched on Monday 8th October 1973, the first legally authorised commercial radio station was LBC, the London Broadcasting Company. After a slow start, commercial radio swiftly picked up with the launch of a number of local radio stations and eventually, national stations, providing new and exciting opportunities for advertisers to reach their consumers.

Over the last decade, there has been a lot of speculation over the future of radio, and whether it can survive amongst the iPods and Spotifys of the 21st Century. The latest Rajar data shows that while weekly reach doesn’t seem to be suffering, users are listening for fewer hours on average per week across almost all commercial stations. This is obviously not great news for the advertiser, as listeners are now exposed to fewer adverts.

But right on cue, radio appears to be going through a mid-life crisis of sorts, with a number of new music streaming services popping up to join the ranks of Spotify and Napster.

Apple Ads

Source: advertising.apple.com

One of the most hotly anticipated is Apple’s new iTunes Radio, which is set to launch in the UK in early 2014, offering a whole new radio experience to listeners. With more than 200 stations to choose from, listeners will be able to skip tracks, purchase songs and even customise stations around their favourite artists, songs and genres.
iTunes Radio is likely to prove attractive not only to consumers, but also to advertisers, allowing creativity and interactivity in ad formats and, most crucially, providing exceptional targeting tools. With registration and media consumption data, advertisers can use insights about listeners’ lifestyle and purchase habits to target with a precision previously unavailable to radio advertising.

Another way iTunes radio is setting itself apart from traditional radio is the frequency of ad breaks. With audio adverts only once every 15 minutes and a video spot every hour, this is fairly minimal compared to other stations; rival streaming services currently play around 8-12 ads per hour, whilst on traditional stations this number rises to 25.

It is currently unknown how much one of these coveted ad spots will cost, but for its recent US launch, the minimum buy-in was reputedly $1m worth of spots, with Apple forming partnerships with McDonald’s, Nissan, Procter & Gamble and Pepsi, giving them exclusivity within their respective industries until the end of 2013.

With the UK launch set for early 2014, brands don’t have long to wait before they can get onto the iTunes airwaves.

It remains to be seen whether iTunes Radio and other music streaming services are set to revolutionise radio advertising, but with year-on-year figures for online and mobile radio listening up 31% and 34% respectively, our radio consumption is clearly moving with the times. As advertising everywhere becomes increasingly digital, it would be a mistake to ignore the new possibilities offered by radio today.

Apple Ads

Source: advertising.apple.com

Climbing the Paywall

It is common knowledge these days that newspaper print is declining as people switch to online alternatives. The rise in the smart phone/tablet market means that consumers now demand up to date, quality news at all hours of the day. What does this mean for the future of news?

Online news, providing rapid access to news content at any time of the day would seem great for consumers, but is it? With declining circulation and readership figures across the industry, the future looks bleak for printed newspapers. News brands’ financial prospects are under threat as revenue for online advertising is not being fully monetized yet. While news brands’ experiment with new business models to try and revive their finances outside of print, the dilution of content reduces the quality of the content published as journalists are being stretched thin. The expectation to write more articles in a shorter time period unsurprisingly impacts the quality of what is being published.

Online News, Newspaper Paywall

Source: www.sprout.nl

The Times and The Sunday Times were the first publishers to adopt the paywall model which is when the consumer pays a subscription fee to access the online content. This was considered suicidal at the time by some; however the model is beginning to flourish with the number of online subscribers increasing 45% between the end of March 2012 and March 2013, to 140,000. Many other rival publishers, including The Sun, have followed suit with the paywall model. Consumers’ paying for their news will ultimately benefit from higher quality service and content as newspapers are able to afford to keep quality journalism a high priority. And besides it is hardly a new phenomenon for consumer to be expected to pay for their news content. What is surprising is how long the idea has persisted that one group of people are paying for printed news, while another group receives the same content for free online.

It seems inevitable for news brands to implement some kind of ‘pay for online content’ system. Chris Blackhurst, content director of the Independent and Evening Standard, believes that it is only a matter of time until all online national newspaper content goes behind a paywall. Studies suggest that this transition will occur over the next three years while 27 per cent of media companies said that they expects significant shift in profit margin increase over the same three year period. There are still unanswered questions and much speculation looming over the pay wall for online content which we will report on as clarity unfolds.

National Newspaper Circulation Figures Decline

The Audit Bureau of Circulation, known commonly as ABC, could also be an acronym for the question ‘Are Broadsheets Ceasing’, judging by their latest report on circulation figures from August 2013.

Looking at the daily and free titles, only the i has shown an overall growth in circulation from the same period last year. It has had the third largest percentage of decline from the previous months circulation figure, behind only its mother title the Independent and also the Financial Times.

July 2013 reported there was a spike in the month on month circulation figures for nearly all the daily titles, which is thought to be due to the hype surrounding the birth of the royal baby. Therefore it does not come as a surprise that the latest figures show a month on month decline for most titles, however the continuing year on year decline is something that would be more of a concern for the future of print. The tables below, taken from the August 2013 ABC circulation report, shows the difference in average circulation for both month on month and year on year figures.

National Newspaper ABC Figures – August 2013
Daily Titles Aug-12 Jul-13 Aug-13 YoY Actual Change YoY % Change PoP Actual Change PoP % Change
Quality
Daily Telegraph 584,089 558,817 557,536 -26,553 -4.5 -1,281 -0.2
Financial Times 280,124 244,768 236,281 -43,843 -15.7 -8,487 -3.5
Guardian 204,271 191,182 189,646 -14,625 -7.2 -1,536 -0.8
i 281,530 305,129 295,179 13,649 4.8 -9,950 -3.3
Independent 81,804 72,271 68,696 -13,108 -16 -3,575 -4.9
Scotsman 36,344 n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a
Times 407,720 400,245 391,643 -16,077 -3.9 -8,602 -2.1
Daily Express 550,502 533,039 530,631 -19,871 -3.6 -2,408 -0.5
Daily Mail 1,914,126 1,781,968 1,802,083 -112,043 -5.9 -20,115 1.1
Daily Mirror 1,088,724 1,040,148 1,045,971 -42,753 -3.9 5,823 0.6
Daily Record 276,270 249,733 252,575 -23,695 -8.6 -2,842 1.1
Daily Star 600,304 544,811 547,955 -52,349 -8.7 -3,144 0.6
Sun 2,502,691 2,281,301 2,258,359 -244,332 -9.8 -22,942 -1
Total Daily 8,808,499 8,203,412 8,176,555 -631,944 -7.2 -26,857 -0.3
London Newspaper ABC Figures – August 2013
London Free Press Aug-12 Jul-13 Aug-13 YoY Actual Change YoY % Change PoP Actual Change PoP % Change
Quality
City A.M. 128,484 128,781 127,488 -966 -0.8 -1,293 -0.1
London Evening Standard 700,895 701,917 686,858 -14,037 -2 -15,059 -2.1
Metro (London) 775,252 770,569 756,658 -18,594 -2.4 -13,911 -1.8
Total London Press 1,604,631 1,601,267 1,571,004 -33,627 -2.1 -30,263 -1.9

In slight contrast to the daily and free papers, just over half the Sunday papers had a rise in month on month circulation. Most of these were the popular tabloid papers, such as Scotland’s Sunday Mail for example, which had the largest percentage increase of 3.4% (an additional 9,466 copies).

All the year on year figures for the Sunday papers was negative, with the Daily Star Sunday being 21.2% lower. Even some of the high quality papers had significant year on year declines, with both the Independent on Sunday and the Observer down in excess of 10%. The table below shows all the Sunday papers month on month and year on year average circulation figures.

National Sunday Newspaper ABC Figures – August 2013
Sunday Titles Aug-12 Jul-13 Aug-13 YoY Actual Change YoY % Change PoP Actual Change PoP % Change
Quality
Independent On Sunday 123,696 114,270 110,157 -13,539 -10.9 -4,113 -3.6
Observer 246,245 220,315 216,839 -29,406 -11.9 -3,476 -1.6
Scotland On Sunday 43,382 n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a
Sunday Times 914,685 844,767 826,462 -88,223 -9.6 -18,305 -2.2
Sunday Telegraph 463,733 436,730 435,323 -28,410 -6.1 -1,407 -0.3
Mail On Sunday 1,811,463 1,658,035 1,675,474 -135,989 -7.5 17,439 1.1
Sunday Express 505,900 475,848 473,286 -32,614 -6.4 -2,562 -0.5
Sunday Post 275,608 242,033 244,637 -30,971 -11.2 2,604 1.1
Daily Star Sunday 439,621 341,733 346,205 -93,416 -21.2 4,472 1.3
Sunday People 457,964 419,115 425,293 -32,671 -7.1 6,178 1.5
Sun (Sunday) 2,133,616 1,927,406 1,916,570 -217,046 -10.2 -10,836 -0.6
Sunday Mail 315,077 281,157 290,623 -24,454 -7.8 9,466 3.4
Sunday Mirror 1,101,206 1,045,341 1,063,293 -37,913 -3.4 17,952 1.7
Total Sunday 8,832,196 8,006,750 8,024,162 -808,034 -9.1 17,412 0.2

In our opinion, one of the main reasons for the decline in print circulation is the broader choice and availability of news content via the internet and also more recently digital versions of the publications and apps created for mobile and tablet devises. Therefore, from an advertiser’s point of view, the continued decline in print circulation is not necessarily negative, it’s just a case of needing to explore all the available avenues in more detail.

Reaching the Rich

The spending power of the wealthy naturally makes them a highly desirable target market. However, they can also be notoriously elusive to advertisers as high-powered jobs leave them with little time to actively consume media.

In order to gain greater insight into this lucrative sector, Kantar Media have published the latest edition of their annual Premier TGI study. It is a survey of adults (aged 20+) in Great Britain who have either a household income or saving and investments of £50,000+ or who are in the top AB social grades.

Based on these findings, Kantar Media organised consumers into quintiles from heaviest to lightest according their exposure to media of different kinds. They found that nearly three million fall into the heaviest category due to lifestyles involving relatively large amounts of commuting, shopping and sport as shown in the graph below.

Media and leisure activities

Source: Kantar Media

The findings related to shopping demonstrate that this group tend to have a high level of disposable income and a willingness to spend it on premium products. This is further evidenced by increased participation in sports requiring specialist and often expensive equipment such as mountain biking. These factors highlight the relevance of this group of consumers for medium and high-end brands.

So how do we reach them? With many working in London, long commutes account for this group’s Out of Home (OOH) exposure suggesting that advertising on public transport could be an effective way. The survey shows that the heaviest media users are more likely than average to engage with advertising on the commute and at work (see graph below). However, wastage is a concern as these premium consumers only make up a small proportion of the huge volume of passengers.

Media consumers advertising engagement

Source: Kantar Media

Print media could offer a more targeted option as this group were found to be around twice as likely as the average to read the free papers – the London Evening Standard, ES Magazine and the Metro. They are also 82% more likely to read the Financial Times reflecting their ambitious natures; the results show that many aim to reach the top of their profession and worry about work in their spare time.

Although the tube is an internet-free zone, we see digital marketing on portable devices as an increasingly important way to target these wealthy commuters when they download versions of their favourite publications. The added advantage of this is the detailed metrics available which make it far easier to establish the reach and effectiveness of a campaign.

Overall, we believe that it is logical to highlight the commute as a key time to target wealthy consumers as it is such a common feature in the lives of this particular demographic. In addition, the restricted range of activities available on public transport increases the likelihood of adverts attracting attention whether they be inside trains, in newspapers and in digital publications.

Mini gets up close and personal with new outdoor campaign

Mini has recently launched a new outdoor campaign to increase brand awareness, which reaches out to its customers in a fun and innovative way, and has got people talking about its brand.

Over the last few weeks, as Mini drivers have travelled between Earl’s Court and West Kensington, they have been greeted by messages such as “Hey cream Mini, what’s your secret?” and “Hello blue Mini driver”, flashing up on giant digital screens. This involves a team of ‘spotters’ stationed at the end of the road, whose job it is to spot Minis driving by, and to trigger a personalised message to appear on the screen.

Mini drivers

Source: adage.com

The screens in question are known as the Cromwell Road Digital Gateway. The series of 9 screens, each of varying sizes, must all be bought together, and cost £200,000 for two weeks.

Mini’s screens form part of their new 8-week integrated campaign, aimed to celebrate and thank their customers. They are also rewarding their drivers with freebies at service stations along the road, including bacon sandwiches or smoothies on the way to work and a tank of fuel or bunch of flowers in the evening. Drivers are also encouraged to upload photos showing ways they have customised their Mini, with the chance to have them displayed on the screens.

The personalisation of marketing messages is becoming increasingly important in today’s economic climate, as advertisers seek to maximise their reach of target audience. Advertisers have long been aware of the increased engagement that message personalisation brings, and technologies such as behavioural tracking and targeting form the lifeblood of most digital campaigns today.

The Mini campaign takes a range of familiar marketing concepts – digital and outdoor, behavioural tracking, targeting and personalisation – and combines them in a new and interesting way to create a really fun brand campaign.

While this combination of technology and techniques may be out of reach for most campaigns today, it’s an exciting glimpse into what we could be seeing regularly in a few years, as the future of personalised marketing really takes off. It will be interesting to see whether (and which) brands are open to taking a risk with new concepts such as these, and exactly what benefits they can bring to a campaign.

Digital magazine readership has risen in 2013.

Lekiosk is an iOS, Android and Windows 8 app that allows consumers to purchase magazines from a rotating 3D news-kiosk. According to new research by Lekiosk, it appears that the number of people reading magazines digitally has risen significantly in 2013.

The ‘Zine on Screens’ report, gathering information from 2000 consumers nationwide, found that one in 20 Brits have purchased digital magazines this year, with this increasing to one in ten among the younger generation, primarily 18-24 year olds.

This spike in digital sales opposes the drop in circulation experienced by a great deal of print publishers. Recently publishers like Bauer Consumer Media saw a discomforting -10.9% YoY decline, while Egmont Magazines saw a surprising 23% growth.

When looking at circulation figures for the top women’s lifestyle magazines for Jul-Dec 2012, we can see that a shocking 28 out of the 38 most popular titles received negative growth, with MORE magazine receiving the worst hit of -39.4% YoY.

Nathaniel Philippe, one of the founders of lekiosk commented on the rising interest in digital magazines produced abroad

Lekiosk Digital Magazines

Source: tech.uk.msn.com

“Digital magazines are easily exported across borders and continents and we’ve seen quite a few users from countries where we don’t source magazines download our apps to get access to the magazines from the countries where we are working with publishers,” he said.

“We’re seeing the start of a trend which could see the digitisation of magazine content drive the globalisation of a wide range of magazines.”

Having to go back and forth between the pages of a magazine, struggling to find some content you are interested in seems extremely time-consuming. Compare this medium to digital editions where the reader can interact with the website and have the information accessible in an easy way, allowing them to automatically go to a desired section i.e. beauty, fashion or property. What seems better? Additionally, sending articles/links to friends to share information is a popular, new trend, a huge bonus of digital magazine editions.

However, despite the decline of print, it still appears to perform a necessary role in the publishing industry.

At the PPA Conference last month, Grazia’s editor-in-chief Jane Bruton and TopGear’s editor-in-chief Charlie Turner were quick to protect print, explaining its significance:

“There will always be a place for magazines,” said Bruton, with Turner adding that magazines are for “expanded and more interesting content that has more value,” before explaining that TopGear often reserves exclusive content as a reward for loyal readers.

In addition, we can appreciate how bringing your tablet into the bath just isn’t the same as taking in a pristine, new magazine and having a leisurely read.

The ‘Rising Stars’ of digital media?

At Four we are always looking for ways to increase the effectiveness of our campaigns.

Visually creative new ideas that encourage audience interactions are being dubbed the ‘the canvasses of the future’ for brand advertising on digital platforms. Needless to say, it is a great way to run a branding campaign that drives user engagement.

As you can see from the chart below, the statistics demonstrate that the click-through rate (CTR) for these rich media banners tends to be significantly higher than standard banners:

Rich Media Banners

Source:http://blog.adform.com/rich-media/is-rich-media-the-key-to-better-engagement/

Some examples of these banners and how they work:

  • Dynamic skins that offer a stimulating background to a webpage.
  • Product carousels that allow the user to scroll through an ad and navigating further accordingly.
  • 3D MPUs literally jump out of the page at you, a sure way to catch the eye of the audience.
  • Gliders that present a floating ad in front of the original article, which can be navigated accordingly by the user.
  • Shutters that play a video advert when a user clicks or hovers over the ad that contain product images and further calls to action, such as ‘view further images’, ‘register now’, ‘click to purchase’ or ‘view more information

Not only do users tend to spend more time engaging with these ad formats, research also shows that users liked the ads more, saying that they improved their impression of the website more than standard banners.

The great advantage of using these ads is that they are deliberately interactive; they are designed to make it as easy as possible to instantly engage with a brand or product. This gives the audience the freedom to interact and explore the advert within a pop-up microsite, without being pulled away from their original article.

Below is an annotated example of an ‘open door’ format created by Adform:

Open Door Ad format

Source: www.adform.com/site/help-and-resources/

News Corp’s new home is the ‘Baby Shard’

Next summer will see News Corporation move into their new home in London Bridge, nicknamed the ‘Baby Shard’. Located in the shadow of The Shard, this building is part of the same £2bn Qatari-funded scheme and was designed by the same architect.

News International has been based in Wapping since 1986 when they moved out of Fleet Street, creating a landmark moment for the British Press.

News Corp in Wapping

Source: mediaweek.co.uk

By moving from Fleet Street, which was the traditional home of the newspaper industry since the 18th Century, Rupert Murdock began the strike that became a yearlong industrial dispute between print unions and News International.

With 17 floors offering 430,000 sq ft of office space, News Corp, will occupy most of the building, with Harper Collins and Dow Jones in the remaining space.

This will be the first time that all of the UK businesses within new News Corp will be under the same roof.

Baby Shard - News Corp

Source: Londonist.com

In support of the move Peter John, leader of Southwark Council said: “I am delighted that News Corp will be moving to such an iconic location in Southwark, bringing new jobs and opportunities to this part of London. The move underlines Southwark’s growing reputation as a place to do business and endorses our work as a council to generate real economic growth.”

With Four Communications having recently moved to the area, it seems that we have set a trend!

The Financial Times are already just around the corner in Southwark Bridge, we have no doubt that this move will only prove to strengthen the relationship Four Media already have with News Corp and open the doors for more opportunities to benefit our clients.

Further to this Robert Thomson, Chief Executive of News Corp said: “Our new London location in the vibrant borough of Southwark will allow us to realize one core objective as the new News – to work more closely and creatively, and leverage our collective resources.”

With IPC also based in Southwark Street it will be interesting to see who else moves into the local neighbourhood within the next year or so as Peter John says: “The move underlines Southwark’s growing reputation as a place to do business and endorses our work as a council to generate real economic growth.”