Daily Archives: September 17, 2013

National Newspaper Circulation Figures Decline

The Audit Bureau of Circulation, known commonly as ABC, could also be an acronym for the question ‘Are Broadsheets Ceasing’, judging by their latest report on circulation figures from August 2013.

Looking at the daily and free titles, only the i has shown an overall growth in circulation from the same period last year. It has had the third largest percentage of decline from the previous months circulation figure, behind only its mother title the Independent and also the Financial Times.

July 2013 reported there was a spike in the month on month circulation figures for nearly all the daily titles, which is thought to be due to the hype surrounding the birth of the royal baby. Therefore it does not come as a surprise that the latest figures show a month on month decline for most titles, however the continuing year on year decline is something that would be more of a concern for the future of print. The tables below, taken from the August 2013 ABC circulation report, shows the difference in average circulation for both month on month and year on year figures.

National Newspaper ABC Figures – August 2013
Daily Titles Aug-12 Jul-13 Aug-13 YoY Actual Change YoY % Change PoP Actual Change PoP % Change
Quality
Daily Telegraph 584,089 558,817 557,536 -26,553 -4.5 -1,281 -0.2
Financial Times 280,124 244,768 236,281 -43,843 -15.7 -8,487 -3.5
Guardian 204,271 191,182 189,646 -14,625 -7.2 -1,536 -0.8
i 281,530 305,129 295,179 13,649 4.8 -9,950 -3.3
Independent 81,804 72,271 68,696 -13,108 -16 -3,575 -4.9
Scotsman 36,344 n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a
Times 407,720 400,245 391,643 -16,077 -3.9 -8,602 -2.1
Daily Express 550,502 533,039 530,631 -19,871 -3.6 -2,408 -0.5
Daily Mail 1,914,126 1,781,968 1,802,083 -112,043 -5.9 -20,115 1.1
Daily Mirror 1,088,724 1,040,148 1,045,971 -42,753 -3.9 5,823 0.6
Daily Record 276,270 249,733 252,575 -23,695 -8.6 -2,842 1.1
Daily Star 600,304 544,811 547,955 -52,349 -8.7 -3,144 0.6
Sun 2,502,691 2,281,301 2,258,359 -244,332 -9.8 -22,942 -1
Total Daily 8,808,499 8,203,412 8,176,555 -631,944 -7.2 -26,857 -0.3
London Newspaper ABC Figures – August 2013
London Free Press Aug-12 Jul-13 Aug-13 YoY Actual Change YoY % Change PoP Actual Change PoP % Change
Quality
City A.M. 128,484 128,781 127,488 -966 -0.8 -1,293 -0.1
London Evening Standard 700,895 701,917 686,858 -14,037 -2 -15,059 -2.1
Metro (London) 775,252 770,569 756,658 -18,594 -2.4 -13,911 -1.8
Total London Press 1,604,631 1,601,267 1,571,004 -33,627 -2.1 -30,263 -1.9

In slight contrast to the daily and free papers, just over half the Sunday papers had a rise in month on month circulation. Most of these were the popular tabloid papers, such as Scotland’s Sunday Mail for example, which had the largest percentage increase of 3.4% (an additional 9,466 copies).

All the year on year figures for the Sunday papers was negative, with the Daily Star Sunday being 21.2% lower. Even some of the high quality papers had significant year on year declines, with both the Independent on Sunday and the Observer down in excess of 10%. The table below shows all the Sunday papers month on month and year on year average circulation figures.

National Sunday Newspaper ABC Figures – August 2013
Sunday Titles Aug-12 Jul-13 Aug-13 YoY Actual Change YoY % Change PoP Actual Change PoP % Change
Quality
Independent On Sunday 123,696 114,270 110,157 -13,539 -10.9 -4,113 -3.6
Observer 246,245 220,315 216,839 -29,406 -11.9 -3,476 -1.6
Scotland On Sunday 43,382 n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a
Sunday Times 914,685 844,767 826,462 -88,223 -9.6 -18,305 -2.2
Sunday Telegraph 463,733 436,730 435,323 -28,410 -6.1 -1,407 -0.3
Mail On Sunday 1,811,463 1,658,035 1,675,474 -135,989 -7.5 17,439 1.1
Sunday Express 505,900 475,848 473,286 -32,614 -6.4 -2,562 -0.5
Sunday Post 275,608 242,033 244,637 -30,971 -11.2 2,604 1.1
Daily Star Sunday 439,621 341,733 346,205 -93,416 -21.2 4,472 1.3
Sunday People 457,964 419,115 425,293 -32,671 -7.1 6,178 1.5
Sun (Sunday) 2,133,616 1,927,406 1,916,570 -217,046 -10.2 -10,836 -0.6
Sunday Mail 315,077 281,157 290,623 -24,454 -7.8 9,466 3.4
Sunday Mirror 1,101,206 1,045,341 1,063,293 -37,913 -3.4 17,952 1.7
Total Sunday 8,832,196 8,006,750 8,024,162 -808,034 -9.1 17,412 0.2

In our opinion, one of the main reasons for the decline in print circulation is the broader choice and availability of news content via the internet and also more recently digital versions of the publications and apps created for mobile and tablet devises. Therefore, from an advertiser’s point of view, the continued decline in print circulation is not necessarily negative, it’s just a case of needing to explore all the available avenues in more detail.

Reaching the Rich

The spending power of the wealthy naturally makes them a highly desirable target market. However, they can also be notoriously elusive to advertisers as high-powered jobs leave them with little time to actively consume media.

In order to gain greater insight into this lucrative sector, Kantar Media have published the latest edition of their annual Premier TGI study. It is a survey of adults (aged 20+) in Great Britain who have either a household income or saving and investments of £50,000+ or who are in the top AB social grades.

Based on these findings, Kantar Media organised consumers into quintiles from heaviest to lightest according their exposure to media of different kinds. They found that nearly three million fall into the heaviest category due to lifestyles involving relatively large amounts of commuting, shopping and sport as shown in the graph below.

Media and leisure activities

Source: Kantar Media

The findings related to shopping demonstrate that this group tend to have a high level of disposable income and a willingness to spend it on premium products. This is further evidenced by increased participation in sports requiring specialist and often expensive equipment such as mountain biking. These factors highlight the relevance of this group of consumers for medium and high-end brands.

So how do we reach them? With many working in London, long commutes account for this group’s Out of Home (OOH) exposure suggesting that advertising on public transport could be an effective way. The survey shows that the heaviest media users are more likely than average to engage with advertising on the commute and at work (see graph below). However, wastage is a concern as these premium consumers only make up a small proportion of the huge volume of passengers.

Media consumers advertising engagement

Source: Kantar Media

Print media could offer a more targeted option as this group were found to be around twice as likely as the average to read the free papers – the London Evening Standard, ES Magazine and the Metro. They are also 82% more likely to read the Financial Times reflecting their ambitious natures; the results show that many aim to reach the top of their profession and worry about work in their spare time.

Although the tube is an internet-free zone, we see digital marketing on portable devices as an increasingly important way to target these wealthy commuters when they download versions of their favourite publications. The added advantage of this is the detailed metrics available which make it far easier to establish the reach and effectiveness of a campaign.

Overall, we believe that it is logical to highlight the commute as a key time to target wealthy consumers as it is such a common feature in the lives of this particular demographic. In addition, the restricted range of activities available on public transport increases the likelihood of adverts attracting attention whether they be inside trains, in newspapers and in digital publications.

Mini gets up close and personal with new outdoor campaign

Mini has recently launched a new outdoor campaign to increase brand awareness, which reaches out to its customers in a fun and innovative way, and has got people talking about its brand.

Over the last few weeks, as Mini drivers have travelled between Earl’s Court and West Kensington, they have been greeted by messages such as “Hey cream Mini, what’s your secret?” and “Hello blue Mini driver”, flashing up on giant digital screens. This involves a team of ‘spotters’ stationed at the end of the road, whose job it is to spot Minis driving by, and to trigger a personalised message to appear on the screen.

Mini drivers

Source: adage.com

The screens in question are known as the Cromwell Road Digital Gateway. The series of 9 screens, each of varying sizes, must all be bought together, and cost £200,000 for two weeks.

Mini’s screens form part of their new 8-week integrated campaign, aimed to celebrate and thank their customers. They are also rewarding their drivers with freebies at service stations along the road, including bacon sandwiches or smoothies on the way to work and a tank of fuel or bunch of flowers in the evening. Drivers are also encouraged to upload photos showing ways they have customised their Mini, with the chance to have them displayed on the screens.

The personalisation of marketing messages is becoming increasingly important in today’s economic climate, as advertisers seek to maximise their reach of target audience. Advertisers have long been aware of the increased engagement that message personalisation brings, and technologies such as behavioural tracking and targeting form the lifeblood of most digital campaigns today.

The Mini campaign takes a range of familiar marketing concepts – digital and outdoor, behavioural tracking, targeting and personalisation – and combines them in a new and interesting way to create a really fun brand campaign.

While this combination of technology and techniques may be out of reach for most campaigns today, it’s an exciting glimpse into what we could be seeing regularly in a few years, as the future of personalised marketing really takes off. It will be interesting to see whether (and which) brands are open to taking a risk with new concepts such as these, and exactly what benefits they can bring to a campaign.