Monthly Archives: September 2011

Consumer Magazines – Latest ABC Results

The latest ABC figures for Consumer magazines were released in the latter part of August, for January – June 2011. The figures made for some very interesting reading, identifying those titles that have weathered the economic turndown and are coming back to full strength and the sectors who have suffered greatly in recent times.

A number of Women’s titles are still holding up well, despite the downturn – with several magazines posting increases. Overall, the market is up 1.1% YoY and 1.5% PoP.

The post-recession market is still having a huge impact on the Women’s Weekly sector, which is down 8% on last year (and 5.4% PoP).

Home Interest is one of the few sectors to benefit from the current economic climate – with a number of titles seeing circulation increases. Over the sector is up by 1%.

The Men’s Lifestyle sector is continuing to struggle – down 4.4% overall on this time last year.

The TV Listings sector had a fairly poor period, with just one title posting a PoP increase between January and June 2011 (What’s On TV).

News & Current Affairs similarly to Home Interest is a sector than has not been greatly affected by the current economic climate, a number of titles seeing circulation increases.

For a more detailed analysis and the full table of results click here

ABC’s Consumer Magazine Research – A Detailed Analysis

Women’s Lifestyle

Condé Nast’s Glamour still tops the Women’s Lifestyle sector following a positive 5.9% PoP increase in sales.

A number of Women’s titles are still holding up well, despite the downturn – with several magazines posting increases. Overall, the market is up 1.1% YoY and 1.5% PoP.

However, some titles in the sector suffered substantial declines, including Marie Claire, Company, More! and Psychologies.

Women’s Weeklies

The post-recession market is still having a huge impact on the Women’s Weekly sector, which is down 8% on last year (and 5.4% PoP).

OK! and Hello were the only two titles who posted PoP increases in sales (up 4.9% and 1.9% respectively).

The top two titles in the sector – Take a Break and New! – have lost substantial copies, while Bauer’s Heat is down by 21.7% YoY (over 90,000 copies).

The decline of the weekly sector is worrying as it is a reflection of the downturn – little treats like a magazine are normally resistant to economic woes. The public are perhaps falling out of love with ‘celebrities’.

Home Interest

Home Interest is one of the few sectors to benefit from the current economic climate – with a number of titles seeing circulation increases, including Country Living, which leads the market.

Ikea Family Live has moved into the top three, with a total circulation of 150,000 copies.

Overall, the market is up 1% on last year.

Men’s Lifestyle

The Men’s Lifestyle sector is continuing to struggle – down 4.4% overall on this time last year.

The free titles – Shortlist and Sport – remain in poll position ahead of paid-for titles Men’s Health and FHM.

It is a bleak picture for some of the best known men’s brands, with FHM, GQ, Men’s Health, Nuts and Zoo all posting both YoY and PoP declines.

TV Listings

The TV Listings sector had a fairly poor period, with just one title posting a PoP increase between January and June 2011 (What’s On TV).

TV Choice, What’s On TV and Total TV Guide saw their circulation rise over the year. Overall, the market is up 1.4% on last year but down 1.9% PoP.

News & Current Affairs

News & Current Affairs similarly to Home Interest is a sector than has not been greatly affected by the current economic climate.

A number of titles have seen a circulation increase, Sense Magazine leading the way with a 5.2% PoP increase.

The Spectator was the biggest loser in the News & Current Affairs sector, with a 10.6% YoY fall.

The New Google Blogger

Google has reinvented itself once again and this time with blogging. Those clever people at Google have redesigned their blogging system with a new design and editing system in its first major update to the blogging platform in years.

The new system resembles the current blog but is simplified. There will also be a useful “Overview” section so that you can check out comments and monitor recent traffic.

Blogger Product Manager Chang Kim explains the difference that the new Google system can make to your blogging experience: “We’ve rewritten the entire editing and management experience from scratch so it’s faster and more efficient for you — and easier for us to update and improve over time.” The new Google Blogger aims to bring people back and see blogger in a fresh and innovative light.

It was recently reported in Mashable that Blogger could be easily surpassed by other more current and relevant blogs such as WordPress, Tumblr and Twitter.

“We’re working hard to fundamentally revamp and improve the Blogger experience from the ground up, and we hope you enjoy the first in a series of major updates that are on their way in the coming months,” Kim says.

It will be interesting to see the progression of Blogger in comparison to the currently popular versions. Will Google be able to compete with the new elite or (as Mashable suggests) fail to catch up with its bigger brothers?

Print Property Supplements Invest

The national press property supplements have clearly reacted to capitalise on the signs of positive growth within the London property market.

The Telegraph is set to launch its new property and interiors supplement called Luxury Homes on October 1st. It will be a 44 page glossy magazine containing a 50/50 ratio split of advertising and editorial. It will only be distributed within the Telegraph’s 500,000 London and South East circulation. It will also be sent to the CEOs of the FTSE top 250 companies to capitalise on its core AB readership.

Luxury Homes will contain editorial features on property trends, overseas, finance, landscaping and interiors as well as home entertainment.

The Daily Telegraph has 1,005,000 readers on a Saturday within the London and South East area (TGI GB 2011 Q1). 55% of these readers are AB adults with savings and investments worth £88,900 on average according to Premier TGI 2011. The average home value of the Daily Telegraphs Saturday readership is approximately £602,606. Luxury Homes will allow advertisers to focus on these readers.

On the other hand, The Sunday Times ‘Home’ section is starting to look dated with no revision in sight for its current layout. The Sunday Times once used to be a guaranteed profit generator for News International. However, over the past two years it has been making a substantial loss. In January News International announced a reported pre-tax loss of £45 million for the 12 months to June 2010.

Conversely, The London Evening Standards property section Homes & Property is showing itself to be a strong part of the London property scene. Homes & Property was launched in 1996 with the aim to provide its London centric readership with reliable and intelligent information on the London property market as well as covering areas such as gardening and interiors.

Its editor Janice Morely and team of expert writers have written all sorts of editorial that focus on different areas of London and abroad. Many Londoners see Homes & Property as an excellent guide to buying and renting properties within the capital. In stark comparison to the Sunday Times the London Evening Standards readership has increased over the same June July period 2010/2011 by 242,000 to a total daily readership of 1,651,000 (ABC readership survey). With Its London centric circulation and audience it would seem that the London Evening Standard and Homes & Property itself is only set to benefit further.

Along with the Telegraph, the Financial Times has redesigned its property section. House & Home was launched in September 2006 with the aim of providing its wealthy global audience the opportunity to read about property, design and gardening at the weekend during their ‘downtime’. It is an internationally focussed and globally distributed supplement within the FT Weekend edition. The Financial Times’ total readership is approximately around the one million mark. 40.4% of the FT’s readership are aged between 25 and 44. Of its total readership 74.1% are male (NRS Jun10-Jun11).

The redesign has been spearheaded by House & Homes editor Jane Owen. The changes have been implemented to keep the product fresh and to reflect the editorial changes that are being implemented by Jane Owen.
The first issue of the redesigned House & Home was launched on September 17th and was for the first time 24 pages, including an 8-page interiors supplement.

The changes to House & Home are very positive in light of the state of world economies and property markets. It shows that the Financial Times has confidence in itself to attract the relevant advertising to fill its pages and that there is a sufficient property and interiors market globally to warrant such a redesign.